Concentrations

Master of Divinity Concentrations

While optional, choosing a concentration can add focus and depth to a degree in a particular area of interest, beyond what may be gained through introductory level courses in an area of study.

Choosing a Concentration

Students may choose a concentration at the end of their first year in the Master of Divinity program and course work begins in the second year. Concentrations are 12-15 hours in length and may require prerequisites.

To declare a concentration, a student must complete and sign the Concentration Declaration Form and obtain his or her adviser’s signature. The form should then be scanned and emailed, or submitted in person, to the Office of the Registrar. A student wishing to change concentrations will need to email his or her name, 7-digit student ID# and the requested change to the Registrar.

Formation and Witness

The concentration in Formation and Witness allows students to explore in greater depth issues of Christian formation, mission, and public witness as matters of both personal and ecclesial practice.

Coordinator
L. Wesley de Souza
Email the coordinator

12 Hours (minimum)

Curriculum Requirements

One of the following foundational courses (3 hours):

  • RE 501 Religious Education as Formation and Transformation
  • RE 501CE Contextualized Religious Education as Formation & Transformation
  • EV 501 Enabling an Evangelizing Church

At least one course on the history, theology or psychology of Christian formation (3 hours):

  • CH 640CEE Contextual Education Elective: History of Clergy
  • HT 510 Medieval Christian Thought
  • HT 629 Mystical Theology
  • RE/RP 601 Dynamics of Faith & Identity
  • RE 605 Dynamics of Difference
  • RP/RE/ES 649 Psychology of Moral Development and Education
  • RP 653 William James: Psychology, Religion, and Ethics
  • SR 621 Howard Thurman: Spirituality and Community
  • ST 681 Sex, Sin, and Salvation: The Christian Doctrine of the Human Person
  • Selected special topics courses (CH, HT, or RP in particular) may also fit this category

At least one course on the practice of Christian formation (3 hours):

  • EV 511 Renewal and Revitalization of the Church 
  • EV/M 697 Evangelism Travel Seminars
  • LA 503 Leading the Congregation
  • LA 503CE Contextualized Leading the Congregation
  • RE 503 Images of God
  • RE/RP 601 Dynamics of Faith & Identity
  • RE 670B Technology for Ministry
  • RE 610 Be(com)ing Christian
  • SR 630 Methodist Church & Race
  • Selected special topics courses (RE in particular) may also fit this category

At least one course in Missions (M) or Preaching (P) (other than P 501) (3 hours):

  • Includes any course (except P 501) with an M or P course number or cross-listing or
  • PC 628 Care for Marginalized Populations

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Justice, Peacebuilding, and Conflict Transformation

The Justice, Peacebuilding, and Conflict Transformation concentration forms religious leaders who are equipped to constructively engage conflict within their congregations and communities by providing a structure for students to reflect theologically on violence, justice and peacebuilding, to study nonviolent alternatives, and to practice skills in conflict transformation. This concentration provides a focal point within the MDiv for those whose vocation includes the constructive engagement of conflict within their contexts of ministry.

Coordinator
Ellen Ott Marshall
Email the coordinator

15 Hours (minimum)

Curriculum Requirements

Both of the following foundational courses (3 hours):

  • ES 671 (1 hour) Skills in Conflict Transformation
  • ES 672 (2 hours) Skills in Conflict Transformation II

The remaining 12 hours will be chosen from among the following electives:

  • OT 659 Texts of Terror: Strategies for Interpreting Troublesome Texts from the Hebrew Bible
  • OT 648 Exile and Restoration
  • OT 670 The Bible and Care of the Earth
  • OT 670CEE Contextual Education Elective: Bible and Care of the Earth
  • HT/RP 651 Shame, Guilt, and the Rites of Reconciliation
  • ST 651 Theologies of Hope and Liberation
  • ST 647 Theology of Dietrich Bonhoeffer
  • ST 659 Theology of Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • ES 609/M 619 Theology of Social Ministry
  • ES 628 The Civil Rights and the Black Consciousness Movement
  • ES 629 Life and Thoughts: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • ES 663 Religion, Violence and Peacebuilding
  • ES 663CEE Contextual Education Elective: Religion, Violence, and Peacebuilding
  • ES 669 Theology of Ethics and Reconciliation
  • ES 678 Morality of Peace and War
  • ES 673 Voices of Nonviolence
  • ES 654 Health as Social Justice
  • M/CC 655 The Church on the Border
  • SR 635 Christian Communalism in America
  • SR 620/CC 619 Nonviolent Strategies of Social Change
  • SR 621 Howard Thurman: Spirituality and Community
  • SR 625 Ecclesiology in Action
  • RE 526 Empowering Youth for Global Citizenship
  • RE 698CEE Teaching Peace in Congregations
  • RE 525R Issues in Educational Ministry with Youth: Unlearning Violence: Learning Nonviolence
  • Selected special topics courses may also fit this concentration when designated on the course schedule.

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Leadership in Church and Community

The concentration in Leadership in Church and Community educates students in the analytic frameworks, critical perspectives, practices, skills and practical theological patterns of reflection necessary for effective leadership in contemporary churches and community organizations.

Coordinators
David Jenkins - Email the coordinator

12 Hours (minimum)

Curriculum Requirements

Students may choose from among the following electives:

  • CC 501 Church & Community Ministries
  • CC 501CE Contextualized Church & Community Ministries
  • CC 511 Urban Ministries
  • CC 511CE Contextualized Urban Ministries
  • CC 619/SR 620 Nonviolent Strategies for Social Change
  • CC/LA 645 Nonprofit Leadership & Management
  • CC 650/SR 650 Faith and Health: Transforming Communities
  • CC/M 655 The Church on the Border
  • ES 629Life & Thoughts: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • ES 632 Pastoral Ethics
  • ES 669 Theology of Ethics & Reconciliation
  • ES 673 Voices of Nonviolence
  • LA 501 Introduction to Religious Leadership & Administration
  • LA 501CE Contextualized Introduction to Religious Leadership & Administration
  • LA 503 Leading the Congregation
  • LA 503CE Contextualized Leading the Congregation
  • M 650 Mission & International Health
  • M 650CEE Contextual Education Elective: Mission & International Health
  • OT 670 The Bible and Care of the Earth
  • OT 670 CEE Contextual Education Elective: The Bible and the Care of the Earth
  • PC 628 Caring for Marginalized Populations
  • RE 698 CEE Teaching Peace in Congregations
  • RE 525R Issues in Education Ministry with Youth: Empowering Youth for Global Citizenship
  • SR Ministries to Children in Poverty
  • SR 621 Howard Thurman: Spirituality & Community
  • SR 607 Morality in American Life
  • SR 625CEE Ecclesiology in Action
  • SR 630 Methodist Church & Race
  • Selected special topics courses (CC courses in particular) may also fit this concentration when designated on the Candler course schedule.

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Religion, Health and Science

The concentration in Religion, Health, and Science provides students with greater depth of reflection on the relationship between faith communities and the sciences, especially the health sciences. In particular, it explores issues of social justice within the church as well as in the larger society.

Coordinator
Emmanuel Lartey
Email the coordinator

12 Hours (minimum)

Curricular Requirements

One of the following foundational courses (3 hours):

  • CC 650/SR 650 Faith and Health: Transforming Communities
  • SR 658 Health and Healing: Understanding the Role of Religion
  • SR 698 Religion & Public Health

At least one course in the category communal, public, global or social justice dimensions of health and religious life (courses vary from 2-3 hours):

  • BSHE 504* Social Behavior in Public Health
  • BSHE/GH 563* AIDS: Public Health Implications
  • BSHE 565* Violence As a Public Health Problem
  • BSHE 567* Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, & Transgender Identities and Public Health
  • BSHE 572* Health Care Issues in Minority Populations
  • CC 501Church & Community Ministries/
  • CC 501CE Contextualized Church & Community Ministries
  • GH 507/ES 654 Health as Social Justice
  • GH 557* Global Health: Anthropological Perspectives
  • GH 573* Gender Sexuality and Global Health
  • M/EV 642(D) Religion, Culture (Society) & Mission in Latin America
  • M 650 Mission & International Health
  • WS 385** Women, Health & Development

At least one of the courses listed in categories A or B below. The courses are grouped in categories for informational purposes only. Students are not required to take course from both A and B categories, but may choose to do so.

A. Ethical, theological or Biblical perspectives on religion and health or religion and science (courses vary from 2-3 credit hours):

  • GH 570* Ethnography, Reproductive Health and Religious Ethics
  • ES 654 Health as Social Justice
  • GH 508* Health and Human Rights
  • NT 622CEE New Testament and Healing
  • OT 670CEE The Bible and Care of the Earth
  • SR 536 Religion & Health in Context: HIV
  • ST 673 Natural Science and the Doctrine of Creation

B. Practices related to religion, health and science with an emphasis on individuals and families (courses vary from 1-3 credit hours):

  • GH 503* Psychosocial Issues for Vulnerable Children & Families: A Global Perspective
  • GH 541* Technology of Fertility Control
  • PC 615 Responding to Suffering: Theological, Psychological and Philosophical Dimensions
  • PC 640 Pastoral Care of Women
  • PC 650 Global Perspectives in Pastoral Care
  • PC 650CEE Contextual Education Elective: Global Perspectives in Pastoral Care
  • PC 628 Caring for Marginalized Populations
  • PC 670/671/672 Pastoral Care Modules: All Topics

*Courses offered at the Rollins School of Public Health, permission required for enrollment. Refer to http://www.sph.emory.edu/cms/current_students/enrollment_services/index.html for course offerings. Contact the appropriate Departmental Advisor for permission: http://www.sph.emory.edu/cms/current_students/adaps.html. Forward email permission for enrollment to candlerregistrar@emory.edu to be enrolled in the class.

**Courses offered in the Women’s Studies department, permission required for enrollment. Refer to http://womensstudies.emory.edu/index.htm for schedules and instructor contact information.


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Religion and Race

The concentration in Religion and Race provides students with greater depth of reflection on the history, construction, expression and influence of race and ethnicity in contemporary society.

Coordinator
Theresa Fry Brown
Email the coordinator

12 Hours (minimum)

Curricular Requirements

At least one course on the history of race (3 hours):

  • AAS 190* History of African American Education
  • BCS 501 Introduction to Black Church Studies
  • HIST 362* History of the Caribbean
  • HIST 566* African Historiographies
  • HIST 585* 20th Century Black Experience
  • LAS 270* Cultures of Latin America
  • M/EV 642(D) Religion, Culture (Society) and Mission in Latin America

At least one of the following courses on the construction of race, or another appropriate course (3 hours):

  • ANT 585* Brazil: Race & Ethnicity
  • CC/M 647 Theologies & Ecclesiologies of Brazil
  • ILA 790* Theorizing Diaspora (or equivalent)
  • SR 621 Howard Thurman: Spirituality and Community
  • WS 585* Race, Gender and Sexuality in Post-Colonial Africa (or equivalent)

At least two of the following courses on the expression and influence of race, or other appropriate courses (6 hours total):

  • AAS 190* African American Poetry: The Black Arts Movement to Hip Hop
  • AAS 247* Racial and Ethnic Relations
  • AAS 345 The Black Freedom Struggle
  • AAS 385* Black Music: Culture, Commerce and Racial Imagination
  • BI 617 African American Biblical Interpretation
  • CM 620 Music and Worship in the Black Church
  • ES 625 Sexuality in the Black Church
  • ES 629 Life & Thoughts: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • EV/M 697 Evangelism Travel Seminar
  • LAS 490RSWR* Caribbean Women Writers
  • PC 650 Global Perspectives on Pastoral Care
  • RE 605 Dynamics of Difference
  • SOC 247* Racial and Ethnic Relations
  • SR 607 Morality in American Life
  • SR 630 Methodist Church & Race
  • WR 624 Rastafari Religion

Students are encouraged to take at least one course in a department or unit of Emory University outside of the Candler School of Theology.

*Courses offered outside Candler - offerings/availability unknown. Refer to http://www.emory.edu/home/academics/programs/college.html for a list of departments with links to departmental schedules. Instructor permission is required for enrollment. Forward email permission for enrollment to candlerregistrar@emory.edu to be enrolled in the class.


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Scripture and Interpretation

The concentration in Scripture and Interpretation provides students with additional depth and proficiencies in the interpretation, teaching, proclamation or context of the Bible.

Coordinator
Walter Wilson
Email the coordinator

12 Hours (minimum)

Curricular Requirements

Foundational Requirements (not included in the 12 hours):

  • OT 501 Interpretation of the Old Testament I
  • OT 502 Interpretation of the Old Testament II
  • NT 501 Interpretation of the New Testament I
  • NT 502 Interpretation of the New Testament II

Additional Requirements

Upon selection of the Scripture and Interpretation concentration:

Choose between two language options: full language instruction in either Greek or Hebrew (6 hours) or concise language instruction in both Greek and Hebrew (6 hours):

  • BL 511 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew I AND
  • BL 512 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew II

OR

  • BL 521 Introduction to Biblical Greek I AND
  • BL 522 Introduction to Biblical Greek II

OR

  • BL 510 Concise Hebrew AND
  • BL 520 Concise Greek

At least two courses two additional courses. Options for these courses include various (a) exegetical courses (focusing on a single text); (b) synthetic, integrative, or thematic courses (comparative reading across texts); or (c) hermeneutical or contextual courses (appropriating texts for a particular setting) (6 hours):

Any BI, OT, or NT elective

Other courses may also fit the concentration but these are subject to approval by the concentration coordinator. Such courses are often cross-listed with BI/BL/OT/NT numbers.

Notes:

a. Elementary language instruction can be done at other institutions (e.g., Columbia Theological Seminary or other schools in the ATA Consortium), but fulfillment of language requirements in these cases must be approved by the concentration coordinator.

b. Proficiency in a language via work done prior to matriculation at Candler must be demonstrated to the concentration coordinator. Students who demonstrate proficiency may use the language requirement to take additional work in the language of their choice or work in different languages. Alternatively, those units may be devoted to further courses within the concentration.


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Society and Personality

The concentration in Society and Personality explores the personal and social dynamics of religious experience, practice and community with keen attention to their felt meaning, cultural expression and institutional embodiment. Through psychological, sociological and cultural inquiry, it enables students to engage and interpret faith lived out in love, work and public witness in local churches, national denominations and global movements, across lines of gender, race, generation and nation.

Interim Coordinator
Ian McFarland
Email the interim coordinator

12 Hours (minimum)

Curricular Requirements

At least one course in Religion and Personality (RP) (3 hours):
  • RP/RE/ES 649 Psychology of Moral Development and Education
  • RP 653 William James: Psychology, Religion, and Ethics
  • RP 655 Life Cycle & Generativity
  • RP/RE 601 Dynamics of Identity and Faith
  • Any other course listed or cross-listed as RP or RLPC (GDR seminars)
At least one course in Sociology of Religion (SR) (3 hours):
  • SR 536 Religion & Health in Context: HIV
  • SR 593 Religion & Health in Context: Sexual and Reproductive Health
  • SR 601 Sociology of Religion
  • SR 607 Morality in American Life
  • SR 613 Gender in U.S. Religion
  • SR 621 Howard Thurman: Spirituality and Community
  • SR 620/CC 619 Nonviolent Strategies for Social Change
  • SR 625 Ecclesiology in Action
  • SR 630 Methodist Church & Race
  • SR/CC 650 Faith & Health: Transforming Communities
  • Any other course listed or cross-listed as SR or RLSR (GDR seminars)
At least one course in World Religions (WR) (3 hours):
Any WR course. Courses from outside Candler such as Jewish Studies (JS) or Graduate or Undergraduate Department of Religion courses focused on other World Religions may also fulfill this requirement.
A fourth course from RP, SR, or WR (3 hours):
With the approval of the concentration director, the fourth course also may be taken outside of Christianity and Culture (Area III) or outside of Candler if the academic work addresses the central scholarly concerns of the concentration. Courses offered in the Graduate School in areas such as anthropology, sociology, psychology and religion require doctoral level academic work. Students must obtain instructors’ permission, and along with that of the concentration director, to enroll in such course.

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Theology and the Arts

The Theology and the Arts concentration involves theological reflection on and critical engagement with musical, visual and literary arts.

Coordinator
David Pacini
Email the coordinator

15 Hours (minimum)

Curricular Requirements

12 hours from among the following courses:

  • CM 610 Congregational Song
  • CM 620 Music and Worship in the Black Church
  • HT 510 Medieval Christian Thought
  • OT 616 Book of Job
  • OT 617 The Psalms
  • OT 617CEE Contextual Education Elective: The Psalms
  • OT 624 Bible and/as Poetry
  • OT 624CEE Contextual Education Elective: Bible and/as Poetry
  • RE 515 The Art of Teaching
  • ST 655 Theology & Literature
  • W 501 Introduction to Public Worship
  • W 622 Worship Practicum: Service of Word & Initiation
  • W 623 Worship Practicum: Eucharist
  • W 624 Worship Practicum: Weddings & Funerals
  • W 632 Contemporary Christian Worship: Origins, Theory, Practice
  • W 638 Planning Christian Worship
  • W 642 Worship Practicum: Writing Liturgical Texts
  • W 643/644 Christian Year Celebrations
  • WR 624 Rastafari Religion

Capstone (3 hours):

  • MDIV 524 Concentration Capstone: Theology & the Arts

The following courses are offered outside Candler and will fulfill Concentration requirements. Offerings/availability unknown, contact the individual department for information. Departmental listings/links are available at: http://www.emory.edu/home/academics/programs/college.html.

  • ARTHIST 470 Defying Death: Art & Afterlife in Ancient Rome
  • ARTHIST 719 Controlling the Cosmos: Kingship in Ancient Egypt
  • ARTHIST 729 Architecture & Ritual in the Sanctuary of the Great Gods, Samothrace
  • ARTHIST 739 Medieval Art as Text for the Illiterate
  • ARTHIST 739 A Puzzling Mirror: The Image of God in Medieval Art
  • ENG 357WR Southern Literature
  • ENG 387R Literature & Religion
  • ENG 389R Special Topics in Literature: Reading Alice Walker
  • ENG 389RWR Special Topics: Literature and Film
  • ENG 389RWR Special Topics: Literature and Psychology: On Going Mad in America
  • FILM 373 African American Women and Cinematic Representations
  • FILM 392S Genre Studies: The Western
  • FILM 405 Experimental/Avant Garde Cinema: Gender & Sexuality in Experimental Film
  • MUS 511 Choral Literature I
  • MUS 512 Choral Literature II
  • MUS 516 Impoverisation and Service Playing
  • MUS 528 Organ Literature
  • MUS 536 Organ Construction and Design
  • MUS 541 Vocal Pedagogy
  • MUS 572R Special Topics in Choral Literature
  • MUS 590A Sacred Music Colloquy
  • MUS 590B Sacred Music Colloquy
  • REL 387R Literature & Religion

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Theology and Ethics

The concentration in Theology and Ethics provides students an opportunity to explore the ways in which theology and ethics inform each other as complementary disciplines oriented to critical reflection on the proper shape of Christian faith and practice in the world.

Coordinator
Jonathan Strom - Email the coordinator
Tim Jackson - Email the coordinator

12 Hours (minimum)

Curricular Requirements

Both of the following foundational requirements (not included in the 12 hours):

  • ES 501 Christian Ethics
  • ST 501 Systematic Theology

It is recognized that students will generally not have completed both these courses when they enroll in the concentration. The concentration is designed with the expectation that some concentration requirements can be fulfilled prior to or concurrently with completion of ES 501 and ST 501.

One course in theology: any ST or HT course, not including HT 501, HT 503 or ST 501 (3 hours):

  • HT 510 Medieval Christian Thought
  • HT/ES 618 Ethics of Aquinas
  • HT 623 Theology of Augustine
  • HT 627 Theology of Luther
  • HT 629 Mystical Theology
  • HT 649 John Wesley's Theology & 18th Century Thought
  • HT 669 The History & Theology of Eucharistic Worship
  • ST 623 Theology of Karl Barth
  • ST 647 Theology of Dietrich Bonhoeffer
  • ST 655 Theology & Literature
  • ST 679 Contemporary Anglican Theology
  • ST 687 Womanist Theology & Narrative Identity
  • Any other course listed or cross-listed as HT or ST (not including HT 501, HT 503, and ST 501)

One course in Christian ethics: any ES course, not including ES 501 (3 hours).

  • HT/ES 618 Ethics of Aquinas
  • ES 625 Sexuality & the Black Church
  • ES 629 Life & Thoughts: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • ES 630 Kierkegaard as Religious Ethicist
  • ES 632 Pastoral Ethics
  • ES 654 Health as Social Justice
  • ES/NT 655 Issues in New Testament Ethics
  • ES/RP/RE 649 Psychology of Moral Development and Education
  • ES 663 Religion, Violence, and Peacebuilding
  • ES 669 Theology of Ethics and Reconciliation
  • Any other course listed or cross-listed as ES (not including ES 501)

Either one additional course in theology or ethics from those listed in 1 or 2 above, or the following course (3 hours):

  • SR 621 Howard Thurman: Spirituality and Community

Concentration Capstone (to be taken during final year in the program) (3 hours):

  • MDIV 526 Theology & Ethics Concentration Capstone Course: Theology & Ethics in Conversation

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Traditions of the Church

The Traditions of the Church concentration allows students to reflect on aspects of Christian tradition and history in a focused way, enabling them to develop historical and denominational interests with explicit attention given to interpretative and methodological questions.

Coordinator
Jonathan Strom
Email the coordinator

12 Hours (minimum)

Both of the following foundational requirements (not included in the 12 hours):

  • HT 501 and HT 503

Three courses relating to the Church’s history and tradition (9 hours):

Courses that fulfill concentration requirements are divided into three categories. The three courses students take to meet concentration requirements may be from any category. Students are not required to complete a course from each category.

The first category includes those courses students may self-select without any consultation with the concentration coordinator. These include all CH and HT courses, with the exception of HT501 and HT503. In addition, some ST, BL, DS, ES, and EV also count.

  • CH 620 Theology in the Monastic Tradition
  • CH640CEE Contextual Education Elective: History of the Clergy
  • ES 629 Special Topics in Ethics: Life & Thoughts of MLK, Jr.
  • HT 510 Medieval Christian Thought
  • HT/ES 618 Ethics of Aquinas
  • HT 623 Theology of Augustine
  • HT 627 Theology of Luther
  • HT 629 Mystical Theology
  • HT 649 John Wesley & 18th Century Religious Thought
  • HT 653 Reality of God
  • HT 669 The History & Theology of Eucharistic Worship
  • M/EV642(D) Religion, Culture (Society) & Mission in Latin America
  • SR 621 Howard Thurman: Spirituality and Community
  • ST 647 Theology of Dietrich Bonhoeffer
  • Any other CH or HT course (not including HT 501 and 503)

The second category are courses that would qualify for concentration credit if there is a term paper or other major project that focuses on an historical aspect of the Christian tradition. To count for the concentration, these courses require an explanation of the project, the approval of the concentration coordinator, and the consent of the course instructor indicating that the proposed project is practical and consonant with the goals of the course. Approval must be secured before the start of the semester in which the course is taught. These courses include but are not limited to the following:

  • CM 610 Congregational Song
  • ES 630 Kierkegaard as Religious Ethicist
  • M 609 Global Church in God’s Mission
  • M 609 CEE Contextual Education Elective: Global Church in God's Mission
  • M 650 Mission & International Health
  • M 650CEE Contextual Education Elective: Mission & International Health
  • OT 670 Bible & Care of the Earth
  • OT 670CEE Contextual Education Elective: Bible & Care of the Earth
  • P 642 Women and Preaching
  • RE 503 Images of God
  • WR 624 Rastafari Religion

The third category of courses that fulfill Traditions of the Church are taught elsewhere in the university and in the ATA, especially but not limited to the Law School, History Department, Art History, ITC, and Columbia Seminary. All courses outside Candler must meet Candler requirements for graduate work and receive the explicit approval of the concentration coordinator prior to the start of the semester.

Denominational courses beyond the introductory can fulfill concentration requirements, including those offered at ITC and Columbia through the ATA.

Required Concentration Capstone (to be taken during final year in the program) (3 hours):

  • MDIV 522 Traditions of the Church Capstone Course: Theology & The Book

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Policies and Procedures

  • Concentrations are optional for Candler MDiv students who entered the program in 2010 or later. They are required for those who entered the program from Fall 2007-Fall 2009.
  • Applicable courses that fulfill degree requirements (IAM, CEE, REG, SR/RP, ES/HT/ST, and Electives) also fulfill concentration requirements where so indicated in each concentration.
  • Capstone courses are taken during the final year at Candler. Typically capstone courses are cross-listed from other appropriate offerings for the spring semester in a given year. Additional work appropriate to a capstone project is negotiated with the instructor of the course and enrollment is listed under the appropriate capstone course number rather than the general course number.
  • All Concentrations have the option for directed studies, internships and the MDiv thesis. These cannot be substituted for the capstone courses (where applicable), but can be substituted for other requirements with the approval of the concentration coordinator(s).
  • Non-Candler courses may be eligible to meet concentration requirements per approval of the concentration coordinator(s). These courses may include courses at other Emory schools and cross-registration courses at ATA schools.
  • Contact the concentration coordinator with a course syllabus or course description and include a written rationale for why the particular course should be an allowable course for the concentration.
  • All courses outside Candler must meet Candler requirements for graduate work and receive the explicit approval of the concentration coordinator before the start of the semester.
  • Courses at other Emory schools require instructor permission for enrollment. Cross-registration courses required an approved cross-registration application prior to enrollment.
  • Any course taken at the undergraduate level requires additional work agreed upon by the student and instructor to meet graduate-level course requirements. Instructor permission is required for enrollment.
  • Within each concentration, a maximum of one concentration course may be taken S/U, in accordance with Candler’s policy regarding S/U courses. Capstone courses cannot be taken S/U. All other concentration courses must receive a grade of C or above in order to fulfill concentration requirements. Note: students who entered Fall 2007 may take up to half of concentration courses S/U.
  • If there is any question about the eligibility of a course for the concentration, please contact the concentration coordinator.

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"I love the enthusiasm Dr. LeMon brings to his classes. And he's balanced, bringing different perspectives and evidence to bear on the issues we're discussing. That's why I came to Candler—to be challenged and stretched beyond my normal ways of thinking about things."
-Melissa Mobley, MDiv '15