Area I Course Descriptions

Introduction to Biblical Study

OT501. Interpretation of the Old Testament I
Credit, three hours. Taught in Fall semesters (Faculty)
Introduction to the Pentateuch and Former Prophets, with attention to the history and cultural context of ancient Israel and to the interpretation of Old Testament prose literature

OT502. Interpretation of the Old Testament II
Credit, three hours. Taught in Spring semesters (Faculty) (Prerequisite: OT501)
Introduction to the Latter Prophets and the Writings, with attention to the cultural context of ancient Israel and the interpretation of Old Testament poetic literature.

NT501. Interpretation of the New Testament I
Credit, three hours. Taught in Fall semesters (Faculty) (MDiv students must complete Old Testament Sequence before enrolling in NT501)
An introduction to the contents and concepts of the New Testament writings, with attention to the historical, literary, and theological dimensions of these biblical books.

NT502. Interpretation of the New Testament II
Credit, three hours. Taught in Spring semesters (Faculty) (Prerequisite: NT501)
An introduction to the practice and theory of interpreting the New Testament, which emphasizes the development of exegetical skills through the writing of papers, the reading of secondary literature, and engagement with diverse hermeneutical approaches.

Biblical Interpretation

BI601. History of Biblical Interpretation
Credit, three hours. (Kraftchick)

BI603. Ancient Judaism in the Mediterranean Diaspora
Credit, three hours. (Wilson)
Cross-listed as WR603
A survey of the literature and religion of the Jewish people during the Second Temple period, with special attention to their interactions with Greek culture and Roman rule.

BI605. Feminist Interpretations of Bible
Credit, three hours. (Faculty)(Prerequisite: OT502, NT502 or permission of the instructor)
A seminar exploring biblical texts and interpretations as they relate to issues of gender, power, and sexuality. The course will include attention to texts from both the Hebrew Bible and New Testament, as well as apocryphal materials. We will explore feminist interpretations from a variety of cultures and consider the future of feminist biblical interpretation. (Race, Ethnicity, and Gender)

BI617. African American Biblical Interpretation
Credit, three hours. (Brown) (Prerequisites: OT501, OT502)
This is a short course on interpretation, specifically African American interpretation of the Bible. The goal of the course is to introduce the student to one method of contextual interpretation that will open up the possibility for exploring it in more depth, or provide a foundation for the study or incorporation of other methods of biblical interpretation. This course begins with the conviction that all knowledge is perspectival. That is, how we access and interpret texts has to do with a complex combination of factors, including ethnicity, which constitutes who we are at one particular instance in time. (Race, Ethnicity, and Gender)

Old Testament

OT601. Genesis
Credit, three hours. (Petersen)
Study of selected texts in Genesis, using diverse methods and with special attention to literary and theological issues.

OT605. Deuteronomy
Credit, three hours. (Strawn)
An exegetical study of the book of Deuteronomy with special attention to its rhetoric and theology and to its pivotal placement in the Old Testament.

OT617. Psalms
Credit, three hours. (Faculty)
An exegetical study of the book Psalms with special attention to their rhetoric and theology and their function as prayer.

OT619. Ecclesiastes
Credit, three hours. (Strawn)
An exegetical study of the book of Ecclesiastes with special attention to its placement in the Wisdom Literature and the larger canon of Scripture.

OT622. Jeremiah
Credit, three hours. (Faculty)
An exegetical study of the book of Jeremiah with special attention to its role as a prophetic text.

OT625. Minor Prophets of the Eighth Century
Credit, three hours. (Faculty)
An exegetical study of the books of the Minor Prophets.

OT626. Apocalyptic Ancient and Modern (prerequisites: OT501, OT502)
Credit, three hours. (Newsom)
An investigation of the origins of apocalyptic thought, its development in early Judaism and Christianity, and its transformation in modern religious thought, focusing on nineteenth and twentieth century American religious movements.

OT631. Job
Credit, three hours. (Newsom)
Detailed exegetical and hermeneutical explorations of the book of Job, including modern responses to the issues raised by Job.

OT648. Exile and Restoration
Credit, three hours. (Newsom)
An exploration of the profound role of the exile in transforming the history, literature, and theology of Israel. The course also attends to the lasting theological resources that emerge from the experience of national defeat and exile as it is refracted in the Bible.

OT649. Bible and Sermon
Credit, three hours. (Same as P649)
This course helps students move from exegetical work to the sermon, attending to preaching that continues both the substance of the biblical text and its form and function.

OT659. Texts of Terror: Strategies for Interpreting Troublesome Texts from the Hebrew Bible
Credit, three hours. (Wright)
Phyllis Trible introduced the expression"Texts of Terror" as a description of biblical texts that deeply trouble us due to the victimization of women they portray and, at times, seem to perpetrate. The expression has since been appropriated more broadly for other kinds of texts that outrage or pain the contemporary reader. In this course students will examine representative examples of such texts that challenge, in various ways, those for whom the Bible is Scripture and a source of guidance.

OT670. The Bible and Care of the Earth
Credit, three hours: (Newsom)
An investigation of the relation between contemporary concerns for environmental ethics and texts from the Bible relevant to those issues.

OT679. Old Testament Colloquy Leadership
Credit, two hours. Offered each semester by invitation of the instructors of OT501 or OT502. Does not fulfill area requirements.

OT698. Special Topics in Old Testament

New Testament

NT540. Teaching the Bible
Credit, three hours. (Faculty) (Same as RE540)

NT601. Matthew
Credit, three hours. (Brown)
This course is an introduction to and close reading of the Christian gospel commonly attributed to Matthew. It studies the historical and theological context of the gospel, including its literary forms, as a means of practicing the art of exegesis.

NT602. Mark
Credit, three hours. (Kraftchick)
This course uses historical and literary tools to investigate the theology of the gospel of Mark, particularly its portrayal of Christology and discipleship.

NT603. Luke
Credit, three hours. (Holladay)
An exegetical study of the Gospel of Luke that gives attention to literary, theological, and historical issues.

NT608. Jesus and the Gospels
Credit, three hours. (Johnson)
This course considers the process of gospel formation within early Christianity, the literary representation of Jesus in canonical and apocryphal Gospels, and the possibilities and difficulties facing efforts to determine the "historical Jesus."

NT611. The Acts of the Apostles (prerequisites: NT501, NT502)
Credit, three hours. (Holladay)
An exegetical study, giving special attention to how Acts relates to Mediterranean life and culture in the first century C.E.

NT613. I Corinthians
Credit, three hours. (Holladay)
An exegetical study of I Corinthians with special attention to its Greco-Roman context.

NT617. Colossians and Ephesians
Credit, three hours. (Wilson)
An exegetical investigation of these letters focuses on how their theological and moral arguments are related to one another and to other letters in the Pauline corpus.

NT625. The Theology of Paul (prerequisites: NT501)
Credit, three hours. (Johnson)
A study of Paul's letters that focuses on how Paul's thinking about God and life in light of the death and resurrection of Jesus can instruct contemporary theologians.

NT626. Paul's Theology of Ministry
Credit, three hours. (Prerequisites: NT501) (Holladay)
An exploration of Paul's apostolic self-understanding and his ministerial strategies as reflected within the Pauline letters and Acts.

NT629. Images of Death in the New Testament
Credit, three hours. (Kraftchick)
This course studies and discusses various NT images for death to determine how these images can be used to develop our conceptions of human existence and mortality.

NT632. Feminist Interpretation of the New Testament
Credit, three hours. (Faculty)
(Race, Ethnicity, and Gender)

NT639. Sexuality in the Bible
Credit, three hours (Johnson)
Contemporary Christian conversations and conflicts over issues of sexuality tend to focus on a tiny portion of Scripture's full and complex witness to this fundamental dimension of human life. This course considers every passage of Scripture that touches on erotic love, marriage, divorce, virginity, same-sex love, and gender relations.

NT649S. Bible and Sermon: Mark
(Same as P649S.) Credit, three hours. (Faculty)
The purpose of this course is to help students improve and interrelate the skills of exegesis, hermeneutics, and preaching. To this end, the course will focus specifically on the interpretation of the Gospel of Mark with a view to preaching it.

NT649U. Bible and Sermon: John
Credit, three hours. (Faculty) (Same as P649U)
This course helps students move from exegetical work to the sermon, attending to preaching that continues both the substance of the biblical text and its form and function.

NT679. New Testament Colloquy Leadership
Credit, two hours. Offered each semester by invitation of the instructors of NT501 or NT502. Does not fulfill area requirements.

Biblical Languages

BL511. Elementary Hebrew I
Credit, three hours. Offered Fall Semesters. (Faculty)
The first of two courses comprising a year-long introduction to classical Hebrew grammar, with an emphasis on reading the Old Testament in Hebrew. Standard reference works for biblical exegesis will be presented.

BL512. Elementary Hebrew II
Credit, three hours. Offered Spring Semesters. (Faculty)
Continuation of BL512, with an emphasis on reading the Old Testament in Hebrew. Standard reference works for biblical exegesis will be presented. The course will culminate in extended reading, with some exegetical treatment, of small books in the Old Testament.

BL513. Lexical Hebrew
Credit, 1 hour. (Faculty)
Provides students with skills in using basic Hebrew language resources (lexicon, concordance) for exegesis and preaching.

BL521. New Testament Greek I
Credit, three hours. Offered Fall Semesters. (Faculty)
An introduction to Koine Greek as reflected in the New Testament and early Christian writings. Emphasis on learning basic vocabulary, grammar, and syntax required to read the New Testament and to do biblical exegesis.

BL522. New Testament Greek II
Credit, three hours. Offered Spring Semesters (Faculty)
Continuation of BL521, with special emphasis on reading representative portions of the Greek New Testament.

BL523. Lexical Greek
Credit, one hour.
Provides students with skills in using basic Greek language resources (lexicon, concordance) for exegesis and preaching.

BL611. Readings in Old Testament Hebrew
Variable credit. (Faculty) (prerequisites: BL511, BL512)
Selected reading from the Hebrew Bible with a focus on standard narrative prose with the goal of acquiring greater facility with vocabulary and grammatical-syntactical constructions. This course may be repeated for credit when the reading selections vary.

BL621. Readings in New Testament Greek
Variable credit. (Faculty) (prerequisites: BL521, BL522)
Emphasis on increasing student's knowledge of Koine Greek vocabulary, grammar, and syntax through weekly readings covering portions of the New Testament and parallel Greek literature. This course may be repeated for credit when the reading selections vary.

LANGUAGE COURSES OFFERED THROUGH EMORY COLLEGE

Elementary Greek 101
Credit, four hours. (Faculty)
Introduction to the fundamental principles of classical Greek language to attain, as rapidly as possible, the ability to read and understand literary works.

Elementary Greek 102
Credit, four hours. (Faculty)
Continuation of Greek 101. Plato's Apology will be read, while the study of the language is expanded to include refinements of the Attic dialect.

Elementary Latin 101
Credit, four hours. (Faculty)
Careful study of elements of classical Latin to attain, as rapidly and steadily as possible, the ability to read and understand literary works.

Elementary Latin 102
Credit, four hours. (Faculty)
Continued study of Latin morphology and syntax. Readings of intermediate difficulty by Latin authors.

--Last updated 01.28.2008